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Archive for the ‘Tutorials’ Category

Union Jack cushion tutorial

This is the most visited post on this site, with several visitors arriving from Google every day.  Please take a look at my Blogshop if you would rather buy one 😉

 

For the June swap on a forum I belong to I made a Union Jack cushion cover.  I had seen these in magazines and fancied a go at making one.  So, I used the last bit of the Ikea Berit fabric I used to make the girls Roman Blind and 2 skirts I absolutely love, but are completely impractical as they are see through!  You will need a denim needle because you are sewing up to 9 layers of fabric.

The first layer is the background.  I cut a piece out of the skirt. (Laura Ashley) and then cut the ikea fabric into stripes, hemming along the length.

Then, starting with one of the diaganal stripes, I laid it onto the bottom fabric, pinned and stitched it.  Then did the same for the other one.  As you can see from the first pic, if you don’t have enough length of your chosed stripe, you can hide the seam at this point!

This was followed up by the cross on the top.

At this point you could trim and hem and add to another larger piece of fabric to make a wall hanging.

I then took the other skirt, a linen M&S one and cut a piece for the back of the cushion 3/4 of the length of the cushion, with one end hemmed (the right of the fabric see pic) and pinned to the front of the right hand side of the cover.  Then I took another (hemmed on one side see pic) piece of the linen skirt 1/2 the length of the cover and pinned that to the top.

Then these pieces were all sewn together.

The seams trimmed and corners cut

Finally I turned it through and stuffed!

Then I made a better one to send!

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Roman Blind take 2

For some reason, I was unable to upload any more pics to the post below, so here is part 2

The next bit is to pin these pockets onto the blind making sure that everything stays square and nothing gets wrinkled. Pin so that the seam will be at the top.

Then sew into place. Slot the dowel into the pockets.

The next bit is to pin these pockets onto the blind making sure that everything stays square and nothing gets wrinkled. Pin so that the seam will be at the top.


Then sew into place. Slot the dowel into the pockets.

Work out your spacing for the eyelets and screw into the dowel through the pockets

Decide which side you want to have the pull cord, turn the blind with it’s back facing you and start to thread the first cord. Feed the cord in from the top and tie the cord with a reef knot to the bottom eyelet, allow enough cord to go across the width of the blind, and then from the top to the bottom, and add a bit 😉

Then take the next collumn of eyelets and do the same. Continue until you have finished threading the blind. Knot the cords at the top for now.

Work out your spacing for the eyelets and screw into the dowel through the pockets

Decide which side you want to have the pull cord, turn the blind with it’s back facing you and start to thread the first cord. Feed the cord in from the top and tie the cord with a reef knot to the bottom eyelet, allow enough cord to go across the width of the blind, and then from the top to the bottom, and add a bit.

Then take the next collumn of eyelets and do the same. Continue until you have finished threading the blind. Knot the cords at the top for now.

Get a piece of batten the same width as your window, staple or tack the blind to a wide edge of it. This bit will be at screwed to the top of the window reveal, or if you are going to screw it to the original board the curtain rail was on it will be at the back, anyway it will be hidden. Line up your eyelets and add one at the top of each row to the battern. Thread the cord through.

Then screw your batten to wherever it is going. Pin the hem. Either hem stitich by hand mitreing the corners or take down and put through the sewing machine. Take the cord and plait it to the end. Screw a cleat into the window sill. Tie up and enjoy!

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Roman Blind take 1

The girls have decided they want a grown up bedroom, the eldest is going off to uni in the autumn so the 16 year old will have it all to herself. She painted it cream and red over christmas, I just need to go round the skirting boards and gloss them again as it looks like someone has died a very violent death in there!

She chose this fabric from Ikea. I love it, and having had it laid out over the back of the Klippan sofas, am tempted to make a sofa cover from it………later!

In the past I have made them without any kits at all. I just buy plastic curtain rings about the size of a penny piece, loads of blind cord and a cleat to wind the cord onto.

This time I have bought the thinest dowel I could find because the way I made them before, I have to help the folds fall into place. You need little eyelets which screw to the dowels for this way.

To work out how many rings / eyelets you need and how much cord, you decide how many strings you are going to have, Then I use paper to mock out the blind. I put lines for the strings at equal distances or 30cm apart. Then mark a cross for every 20 cm down the strings. The amount of crosses is the amount of rings/ eyelets I need. To work out how much cord I need, I measure the drop, multiply by the amount of strings used, multiply by 2, then work out the width of the blind, multiply that by the number of strings and then multiply by 2. Add both figures together and round up to the nearest metre. You should have enough for notting, plaiting and winding up at different heights. IYSWIM!

if you are using dowel you will need little screw eyelets instead of rings!

For best results in the future, if you wash your material now, you wont have the same problem I had a couple of weeks ago, I washed a blind then had to lower the height the blind was fixed at!

You need to cut the fabric out with a 2″ margin for hems all round

The way that I make sure it is all square is quite time consuming an possibly not the best way, but I’m self taught so here goes:

From the selvedge (sp?) you make a cut into the fabric about 1cm up and then use the last thread as your marker. Pull the thread gently out and snip along that line as you go. Measure however many times you feel comfortable with (prob add an extra couple of inches for just in case, you can always trim at the top) and then do the same.

Lay out both your fabrics: Right side down for the facing fabric, then on top right side showing the lining fabric.

The next bit can be a bit tricky and makes a lot of difference on how it looks when it is done. You need to smooth out the fabric so that there are no wrinkes and it all lays flat and square IYSWIM. Make sure you are leaving your seam allowance all round.

Then fold over the sides and pin down. Put a towel on the floor (I assume you are doing this on the floor) under the fabric and iron the seams down.

The next step is to sew these two side seams. Use the lines on your sewing machine bed as a guide:

You need to cut your dowles to size and smooth the cut ends with sandpaper. Then take some more fabric, usually the same as the lining and make ‘pockets’ for it.

Take 8-10cm width of the pocket fabric by the length of the dowels + a bit. Turn over 1-2 cm to hem

Iron.

Then pin the neatened edges together

Then sew the end up

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